Difference between revisions of "Using a piezo element as a contact mic"

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If you want to record or amplify the sound vibraitons from a surface, you can use a piezo element as a contact mic.
 
If you want to record or amplify the sound vibraitons from a surface, you can use a piezo element as a contact mic.
  
[[File:piezo.png]]
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[[File:piezo.png|200px]]
  
 
However, do not hook them up directly to other audio equipment!
 
However, do not hook them up directly to other audio equipment!
 
There can be harmful high voltage spikes.
 
There can be harmful high voltage spikes.
  
A good preamp to use is from collins lab:
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A simple and o.k. preamp to use is [http://makezine.com/2011/12/20/collins-lab-diy-contact-mic/ this one from collins lab]
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If both sound quality and equipment safety is not your greatest concern, a very simple solution is [http://www.zachpoff.com/diy-resources/simple-contact-mike/ this one]
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If you want to hook it up directly to a speaker:
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[[File:Piezo&lm386.png]]
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(The 220 resistor can be varied, for more or less gain.
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The 3.3M can be replaced with a 1M resistor which is easier to find...)

Latest revision as of 12:23, 30 June 2015

If you want to record or amplify the sound vibraitons from a surface, you can use a piezo element as a contact mic.

Piezo.png

However, do not hook them up directly to other audio equipment! There can be harmful high voltage spikes.

A simple and o.k. preamp to use is this one from collins lab

If both sound quality and equipment safety is not your greatest concern, a very simple solution is this one

If you want to hook it up directly to a speaker:

Piezo&lm386.png

(The 220 resistor can be varied, for more or less gain. The 3.3M can be replaced with a 1M resistor which is easier to find...)